Neuromorph Technologies

Microprocessors configured more like brains than traditional chips could soon make computers far more astute about what’s going on around them.

An alternative design for computer chips will enhance ­artificial intelligence. Neuromorphic engineering, also known as neuromorphic computing, is a concept developed by Carver Mead, in the late 1980s, describing the use of very-large-scale integration (VLSI) systems containing electronic analog circuits to mimic neuro-biological architectures present in the nervous system. This is one of the most crucial emerging technologies. People in the tech world talk of a technology “crossing the chasm” by making the leap from early adopters to the mass market. A study in chasm crossing is now unfolding in neuromorphic computing. The approach mimics the way neurons are connected and communicate in the human brain, and enthusiasts say neuromorphic chips can run on much less power than traditional CPUs. The problem, though, is proving that neuromorphic can move from research labs to commercial applications